ARTICLES

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Chalker Scott

Dr. Linda-Chalker Scott – The Definitive Guide to Gardening Sustainably in Today’s Back Yard
Linda Chalker-Scott, our keynote speaker at the MMGA 2017 Annual General Meeting is sharing her presentation.
Download pdf >
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Dr. Eva Pip – Poisonous Plants in Prairie Gardens > DOWNLOAD .PDFalkaloids1
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Fall is Coming – Plant Ahead – Plant Bulbs – by Colleen Zacharias

Making a Moss of your Garden – by Colleen Zacharias

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An Annual Treat for the Backyard – by Colleen Zacharias

Parched Plants need Hydration – by Colleen Zacharias

Care for Amaryllis – University of Minnesota, Extension Services

 

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Hellebores – Rare sight to much delight   –   by Colleen Zacharias

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Layering Greenery in Landscapes – by Colleen Zacharias

Bicolour Bonanza – by Colleen Zacharias

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A Future without Bees Stings – by Colleen Zacharias

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Kokedama or String Gardens

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Clematis – Queen of Vines – by Colleen Zacharias

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Sweet Peas – by Colleen Zacharias

Indoor Garden Party – Houseplants by Colleen Zacharias

Gardening all the Thyme – Herbs by Colleen Zacharias

Peppers – Welcome to Scoville – by Colleen Zacharias

Calla Lilies – Ace of spathes –  by Colleen Zacharias

Here Comes the Bloom – by Colleen Zacharias

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To-may-to To-mah-to – by Colleen Zacharias

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Flower Power – Hydrangea play starring role in fall garden   –   by Colleen Zacharias

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Resurrection of the Lily – by Colleen Zacharias

  • For further red lily beetle information:

http://carleton.ca/biology/people/naomi-cappuccino/
Red Lily Beetle Tracker
Biocontrol of Red Lily Beetle

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Never Alone Rose a ‘star in the ocean’ – by Colleen Zacharias

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Pretty Bells – Heuchera – by Colleen Zacharias

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Going to Seed – by Colleen Zacharias

New Kids on the Block – by Colleen Zacharias

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Roses are Red and Tri-coloured too – by Colleen Zacharias

Autumn Garden Winterizing – Colleen Zacharias

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Freshly Picked Fruit – Philip Ronald

Dwarf Trees Never Short on Beauty – by Colleen Zacharias

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Square Foot Gardening – by Mick Manfield

Back to Nature – by Becky Slater

 

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Spring seeding isn’t just for farmers – by Jeannette Adams

Lifting, Storing Bulbs for Next Year’s Blooms – By Colleen Zacharias

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GARDENING:  Harvest a Plenty By Lenore Linton

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GARDENING: Visit the Tropics in your backyard  By Colleen Zacharias



The tasteful garden.Add some wine and dessert to your flower beds
  By Marilyn Dudek


Have a succulent summer  By Marilyn Dudek

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Tiny helpers By Jeannette Adams

Extending the Life of Holiday Plants By Colleen Zacharias

Hydrangeas: Beautiful Bloomers By Colleen Zacharias

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Irises By B J Jackson
Master Gardener program/profile re local MG’s

Fall Vegetables By Karen Loewen

Colour Principles in the Garden By Lynn Collicutt

Overwintering roses By Lynn Collicutt

Fall Garden Clean-up By Susan LeBlanc

Garden photography By Damien Bilinsky

Overwintering specialty plants By Erna Wiebe

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Tried and True perennials By Jeannette Adams

Mighty Irises By Barbara-Jean Jackson

Colourful Options for Manitoba Tree Planting  By Mike Allen

Garden Tips:

Overwintering Asiatic Lilies in containers:  submitted by Linda Curtis (Winnipeg, MB)

“I just wanted to let you know that an overwintering experiment for Asiatic lilies worked and with about 15-20 bulbs split into 3 containers, at least 80-90% immerged and are healthy.  One bulb had rotted.  I did this for two reasons, first, to keep the rabbits from eating them and second to contain any lily beetle infestation to this area where I could check easily.  I cleared the lilies out of the rest of the garden.  The container sizes were: 2 -19inch wide by 18 inch deep and tapering slightly to the ground and one was 15 inches wide and 15 inches deep.  They were made of fiberglass and for winter I put 2 in my sunroom out of the wind and somewhat protected and the other I left outside near the house with bubble wrap around it.  I’m hoping this fall to leave them where they are but huddle them together, wrap and put leaves on top of each.  It will be exciting to see the blooms in the next few weeks.  They’re about 6 inches high at the moment.”